New & Improved Confusing Die by John Fabjance

Confusing Die by Fabjance

$74.50


New & Improved Confusing Die
by John Fabjance


This video shows the New & Improved CONFUSING DIE
as performed by John Fabjance before a live audience.


This video shows the handling of the New & Improved CONFUSING DIE
as viewed from the FRONT (by the audience).


This video shows the handling of the New & Improved CONFUSING DIE
as viewed from the BACK (by YOU the magician).

Made of Styrene with Self-Aligning Neodymium Magnetic Spots

Magician displays card representing a flat die with one spot on the front and two spots on the back. He then turns the card over and reveals three spots and over again to reveal four spots.

The magician now explains how the trick is done only to further confuse the audience by displaying five and six spots.

Why a die?
A die is instantly recognizable.
A die has great potential opportunities for multiple story-lines and routines.
A die allows for a presentation that is sequential, logical and is easy to follow.

Suggested Routines

Teach-A-Trick
You perform the first phase of the trick showig one spot, two spots, three spots then four spots. You offer to explain how it is done. "Now as a rule, magicians don't normally show how a trick is done but this is so clever I just have to show someone. I'll tell you the secret of the trick. But first, you have to promise not to tell anyone else. Please raise your right hand and repeat after me. 'I, promise, not to tell the secret of the trick.' Okay, you can put your hands down. Now, kids, watch closely, and, if you have any problems, ask your parents for help. See what's really going on. I've been strategically covering black spots and empty spaces with my hands in such a way as to create the illusion of one, two, three and four spots. See, this side can be used to show either a two or a four. And this side can show either a one or a three. And the illusion is so convincing, that even after I tell you how it's done, you will still swear that you saw four spots on this side and three on this side! Practice every day. And when you get real good you will learn how to make a five and a six. But that part takes a little more practice. So, don't be discouraged if you don't get it right away."

Testing, Testing, One, Two, Three, Four
"Can everyone hear me? No doubt, you, like me, have been audience to a speaker or entertainer who began a program by asking just such a question. Now as a magician, when I, myself am in front of an audience, in addition to wanting to be sure that everyone can hear what I'm saying, I need to be sure that everyone can see what I'm doing. For this reason I like to begin my presentation with this visual equivalent of a sound check."

I Once Saw A Magician Do A Trick
"I once saw a magician do a trick. He had a flat die with one spot on the front and two spots on the back. He then turned the card over and revealed three spots and over again and revealed four spots. I was so impressed that after the show, I went back stage and asked the magician if he would teach me that trick. He said, "Sorry, a magician never reveals his secrets," and walked away. So I went to my local magic shop and asked the man behind the counter if he had the trick with the flat die that has one spot on one side, two spots on the other side, three spots on other side and four spots on the next. The man behind the counter said "No, sorry, we don't carry that trick. However, we do carry an even better trick. I asked him to show me his trick. He brought out a flat die with one spot on one side, two spots on the other side, three spots on other side and four spots on the next. I said, "That's it." So, I bought the trick and he proceeded to teach me the secret .

Packs Flat, Play Big
"Today I wanted to show everyone a demonstration with a die. However, the typical die is far too small to be seen by an audience of this size. I did find one large enough for everyone to see but it took up too much space in my travel case. So I brought this two-dimensional representation of one instead. However, being only two-dimensional, it only accurately represents two sides. Now a die has six sides. So, for my demonstration to work, I would need a total of three of these two-sided dice. But I found that three were too many to hold and handle properly for demonstration purposes. With a little ingenuity I was able to come up with a solution to my problem. Here it is. Now one side is accurately represented here and a second here. On the other side is a third, followed by a fourth on this side. I don't know about you, but I've got to see that again myself. You watch the front and I'll watch the back. (Repeat showing ONE through FOUR.) Now as a rule, magicians don't normally show how a trick is done but this is so clever I just have to show you how it's done. See what's really happening. I've been strategically covering black spots and empty spaces with my hands in such a way as to create the illusion of one, two, three and four spots. See, this side can be used to represent either a two or a four. And I save 25% on the cost of ink to boot! And this side can represent either a one or a three. I save 33% on the cost of ink on this side! And the illusion is so convincing, that even after I tell you how it's done, you will still swear that you saw four spots on this side and three on this side! I know what you're asking yourself. You're asking what about the five and the six? Well, I found that with the extra money I was saving on ink I could afford to print the five for only an additional one-fifth the cost and the six for an additional one-sixth and still come out ahead!"

Solution Graphics